Loading...
TOMMY GUERRERO

TOMMY GUERRERO

May 10, 2019

Profile

Name:
Tommy Guerrero
DOB:
1966
POB:
San Francisco, California, United States
Occupation:
Skateboarder / Musician

Fuck You Spirit and D.I.Y. Spirit is a feeling that “Move on my own without giving up the value I think is absolute. “Now children can only be given choices to cram knowledge, they have no time to feed their creativity. Playing freely with friends, raising curiosity, cultivating the courage and responsibility has become lie low for a while. However, what you need is not ‘Pressure-free’ but 100% pure and violent with naked bone instinct barely naked prescription. A remedy called Tommy Guerrero is here.

The musical side of my family is my father’s side. Me and my brother didn’t grow up with my father or his family at all. It is really genetic is what it is.

The musical side of my family is my father’s side. Me and my brother didn’t grow up with my father or his family at all. It is really genetic is what it is. But my grandfather was a jazz guitar player and violinist and my grandmother was the vocalist because they had a band together. Then, their four sons were all musicians. My father was a musician and all three uncles were musicians. My father played pretty much every instrument. They used to play – he used to play, from what I am told, in Fillmore, the old jazz district in San Francisco. He had said that he had sat in with a lot of different players who came through, like heavy jazz player. I think he said Jimmy Smith and some people of that nature. We didn’t learn about this history until much later in life.

My brother and I started playing music when I was about 12 or 13. He is my older brother, three-and-a-half years, and so, he first was playing drums. Yes. Then, I was actually singing in the very first band, punk rock band, and then I started playing bass. That is what I – I am mainly a bass player. That is what I grew up playing. But, you know, genetics has a way of forcing these things upon the next generation. We can’t escape who we are, right, genetically? So, luckily, from that side of the family, me and my brother got the musical gene. He is a much better guitar player than I am, different style of rock and roll. Very First band call Jellys Kids but very small unknown, and after Jellys Kids band was Revenge, and then Free Beer. Free Beer last show as a band 1984 with Suicidal Tendencies and Angry Samonas.

Skateboarders were just like the punkers. There was a certain commonality and understanding between the two. Skateboarding and punk rock came from the same place, the same spirit of very sort of D.I.Y. attitude and sort of ‘fuck you’ attitude toward mainstream society.

There is really not one artist, because I have changed throughout the years my style of playing. I went from playing punk rock to – I mean, so we can go all the way back to the beginning. My first initial experience with punk rock music was seeing that the Ramones in 1978-79. And so that started the whole movement towards playing punk rock with my brother and friends. And when the Sex Pistols came to San Francisco, I think it might have been even earlier, I had seen them on the news and it just, I was very intrigued because it was, it went against everything, it was a big ‘fuck you’ to everything. And as a little kid, a skateboarder, it just made skateboarding and punk rock came from the same place, the same spirit of very sort of D.I.Y. attitude and sort of ‘fuck you’ attitude toward mainstream society, because even as a skater, as a young kid, you were still look down upon, so it was something that was not worthy.

And then punk rock came along as the same thing, a lot of people there was a huge backlash because it was people who didn’t really learn how to play their instruments, they just started playing music. And just because it was part of the necessity, so you convey these emotions that you have and a message that you have that how pissed off everyone was and what was going on, and it all really came from Europe, from the U.K. and what was going on over there, and then it echoed across into the states. And there were a lot of things at the times, 1980 and the 80s and the power is that be, we’re doing all kinds of terrible things. It just really resonated with certain type of people and skateboarders were just like the punkers. There was a certain commonality and understanding between the two.

When hip-hop was coming in the early 80s, I really got intrigued by that because it was very similar to punk rock to me. D.I.Y., you have to create and you have to make music, and so what they have created out of nothing.

The punk scene formed a large part of who I am of the D.I.Y. spirit, and so that just lead into playing bands and making music, and then from there what happened is you pick up an instrument, you just start messing around. And then over time, I was really into that I would just play for hours upon hours and play my bass. And you start progressing as a musician and punk rock was not about progression, it was more about a message, it was a vehicle for message. And from there, I wanted to start to progress as a musician, I would want to learn different types of music, something more challenging.

Then I started getting more into metal, and metal at the time was like Black Sabbath and these type of bands, these types of rock bands and Motorhead. And then I was really a big fan of Rush to Geddy Lee, and trying to play all the crazy bass. And then it just progressed from there into when hip-hop came in my life in the early 80s, there was like I was listening to all types of music – punk, a lot of the new wave stuff, a lot of the stuff like The Cure, Joy Division and New Order and then everything that was happening with that, but at the same time when hip-hop was coming in the early 80s, I really got intrigued by that because it was very similar to punk rock to me. D.I.Y., you have to create and you have to make music, and so what they have created out of nothing was using turntables and using a couple of seconds of music from a record and moments on that record to create and juggle these beats and to create songs out of just disperate elements of music. It was so just groundbreaking and the way they approach it and rap again was a vehicle for a message and so with punk rock. And to me punk rock and hip-hop made total sense. And this was all about hip-hop, but I was all on the base player, so I am really into rhythm. All the beats and everything that came from the hip-hop which comes from more funk and it was just magnet for me.

I had all these different things clashing at the same time and happening with different types of music that I really love.

I had all these different things clashing at the same time and happening with different types of music that I really love. So, I started making beats around 1991 and had the sampler and some other things, I started making beats, and I had sampled my basslines. I play my guitar over and sampled that, loop things, and I was creating some beats for rappers but that never really worked out. I work with a bunch of friends who are rappers and stuff, but it never really worked out. I had all these beats, instrumental beats and with these guitar I put some guitar stuff over it and that’s how it all really evolved, it just kind of happened.

To say like what band specifically influenced me there is so many. I mean, I could give you a breakdown like, from the earlier stuff, and there was lot of rock ‘n’ roll that I love too but the earliest punk stuff from the Sex Pistols and all the English stuff, Stiff Little Fingers, Buzzcocks, all that stuff and then going into like, more like American punk, California stuff where I grew up, there are so many great punk bands there. And then from there was got into metal stuff got into hip-hop and the earliest hip-hop like, one record for me was paid in full, Eric B. & Rakim. That was like, that was it, that was like incredible, that was something that had… stylistically had never been done, Rakim’s flow, his style, the beat, everything. It just, I think, was ushered in the new wave of rap from just from yes, you all into like Kurtis Blow to something much more thoughtful. And then from Eric B. & Rakim and Public Enemy and KRS-One and then into Gang Starr and then into Tribe Called Quest and those formed me like what they were sampling and their approach to beat making like collaging, I think, of them as an audio collage, you are taking desperate elements from various places and creating a new context for this new type of music.

 

Latest Issue